Saturday Check-in

Saturday, March 31, 2007

Been feeling under the weather the last few days, so I've been missing in action. I'm not disappearing again. Just had some things that came up. First, being sick, and the second dealing with some issue on line. It's kind of weird how you meet people here on the Internet. Sometimes you meet some really odd people. Sometimes even on the bit unstable side. I've had one such instance this past week, and it was a bit draining. I'm hoping it is settled now. I have my fingers crossed anyway.

Last night, I had my computer give me some problems. My monitor actually. It wouldn't turn on. then out of nowhere five minutes later it would turn on by itself. Then unplugged the power strip from the wall, plugged it back and now its fine. I went out and bought a brand new power strip today, and even picked up a new set of speakers. I'm keeping an eye on the monitor though in case it is breaking down. I still have a warranty through December, so it would be a matter of taking it in and having Best Buy replace it.

When it comes to computer, you don't realize how much you depend on them until they break down. A monitor is easy to fix, but what if your hard drive goes out? Even worse, what if you need to wipe your hard drive? There is a chance you'd lose all the information stored on your drive. I've had it happen to me before, more than once actually. It isn't a fun thing to have happen. Luckily, there are many ways to back-up your data. There is both sources online and offline these days. I found one such site online to help back up your computer data just a few days ago, Online data backup, secure and reliable. You really never know when the worst might happen. I'm glad it is only my monitor giving me a bit of a headache at the moment.


LoudLaunch - Compensating bloggers for their unbiased opinions, reviews, and analysis. View the LoudLaunch campaign release this post was based on.

6 comments:

Doris Booth said...

Bestselling Author's Secrets for Writing Scenes

Hi,

Here's the first of 12 tips for fiction writers from bestselling author Bonnie Hearn Hill on how to create, link and focus better scenes. Be sure you've added yourself as a friend to receive Bonnie's next important step.


SCENE CHECKLIST

The Big Twelve


Once you learn to create and link focused scenes, you will be well on your way to writing marketable fiction. Keep this list close to your computer to guide you through the process.


Tip 1. Who is the point-of-view character for this scene?

Note that every scene should be told through a point-of-view character, although you can have more than one POV character in a book (but no more than you need). One reason for this focusing is so that we feel the character struggle with a scene goal. The struggle takes place through action and dialogue with little internalization/exposition.

A scene is a dramatic unit that includes scene goal, conflict (through action and dialogue) and resolution.


Be sure to check out Bonnie's online classes in Authorlink's Virtual Classroom at www.authorlink.com/classroom/classroom.php

Doris Booth

Editor-in-Chief Authorlink.com

Manager, Authorlink Literary Group


dbooth@authorlink.com

(972) 650-1986

www.authorlink.com

http://www.authorlink.blogspot.com

Doris Booth said...

Bestselling Author's Secrets for Writing Scenes: Tip #2

Hi,



Here’s Secret #2 of 12 tips for fiction writers from bestselling author Bonnie Hearn Hill on how to create, link and focus better scenes. Be sure you’ve added yourself as a friend to receive Bonnie’s next important step! Also, check out Bonnie’s online writing class at www.authorlink.com/classroom/classroom.php



SCENE CHECKLIST

The Big Twelve



Once you learn to create and link focused scenes, you will be well on your way to writing marketable fiction. Keep this list close to your computer to guide you through the process.



Tip 2. What does your protagonist want in the story?

This is what Jack Bickham calls the story question. It is your external plot, and it is as simple as: Will Jane find the killer? It is not something like: Will Jane find true happiness? That is internal conflict and may even be a subplot.



Doris Booth

Editor-in-Chief Authorlink.com

Manager, Authorlink Literary Group

dbooth@authorlink.com

(972) 650-1986

www.authorlink.com

http://www.authorlink.blogspot.com

Doris Booth said...

Bestselling Author’s Secrets for Writing Scenes: Tip #3

Hi,

Here’s Secret #3 of 12 tips for fiction writers from bestselling author Bonnie Hearn Hill on how to create, link and focus better scenes. Be sure you’ve added yourself as a friend to receive Bonnie’s next important step! Also, check out Bonnie’s online writing class at www.authorlink.com/classroom/classroom.php

SCENE CHECKLIST
The Big Twelve

Once you learn to create and link focused scenes, you will be well on your way to writing marketable fiction. Keep this list close to your computer to guide you through the process.

3. What does your POV character want in this scene; what is his/her scene goal?
Without a clear scene goal, you will not have a scene; you will have an event. “I want to give the reader some insight into my character,” may be the author’s scene goal, but it is certain to lead you to an event, not a scene. This is not about what you want but what your character wants.

Doris Booth
Editor-in-Chief Authorlink.com
Manager, Authorlink Literary Group
dbooth@authorlink.com
(972) 650-1986
www.authorlink.com
http://www.authorlink.blogspot.com

Doris Booth said...

Bestselling Author’s Secrets for Writing Scenes: Tip #4

Hi,

Here’s Secret #4 of 12 tips for fiction writers from bestselling author Bonnie Hearn Hill on how to create, link and focus better scenes. Be sure you’ve added yourself as a friend to receive Bonnie’s next important step! Also, check out Bonnie’s online writing class at www.authorlink.com/classroom/classroom.php

SCENE CHECKLIST
The Big Twelve

Once you learn to create and link focused scenes, you will be well on your way to writing marketable fiction. Keep this list close to your computer to guide you through the process.

4. What’s at stake? What will happen if the character doesn’t reach the desired scene goal?
A good way to up the tension in a scene is to up the stakes.

Doris Booth
Editor-in-Chief Authorlink.com
Manager, Authorlink Literary Group
dbooth@authorlink.com
(972) 650-1986
www.authorlink.com
http://www.authorlink.blogspot.com

Doris Booth said...

Bestselling Author’s Secrets for Writing Scenes: Tip #5

Hi,

Here’s Secret #5 of 12 tips for fiction writers from bestselling author Bonnie Hearn Hill on how to create, link and focus better scenes. Be sure you’ve added yourself as a friend to receive Bonnie’s next important step! Also, check out Bonnie’s online writing class at www.authorlink.com/classroom/classroom.php

SCENE CHECKLIST
The Big Twelve

Once you learn to create and link focused scenes, you will be well on your way to writing marketable fiction. Keep this list close to your computer to guide you through the process.

5. Where is the scene taking place?
Scenes on the telephone are weak, although it’s almost impossible to omit them. Scenes in most coffee shops and bars are weak. Take that scene in the bar and put it on a ski slope, a sailboat or in a factory that manufactures frozen enchiladas.

Doris Booth
Editor-in-Chief Authorlink.com
Manager, Authorlink Literary Group
dbooth@authorlink.com
(972) 650-1986
www.authorlink.com
http://www.authorlink.blogspot.com

Shari said...

I'm tagging you! sharistraight.blogspot.com

 
 
 
 
Copyright © Inside My Wild Mind